slider placeholder Offering peace of mind
during surgery

Making your surgery safer

Neuromonitoring reduces the risk of injury to the nerves, brain, and spinal cord during surgery. In the operating room, Surgimon will alert your surgeon to a potential problem before it is too late.

Use our map to see where surgeons are using Surgimon neuromonitoring. Enter your location and search by specialty.

      Any reference in this website to any person, or organization, or activities, products, or services related to such person or organization, or any linkages from this website to the website of another party, do not constitute or imply the endorsement, recommendation, or favoring of Surgimon, or any of its employees or contractors acting on its behalf.

      Who Pays For It?

      Neuromonitoring is billed to your insurance plan. Depending on your insurance plan’s participation requirements for neuromonitoring providers, it may be billed out-of-network. Most neuromonitoring procedures are covered by your insurance, but if your procedure is not, you will not receive a bill from us. Rather, the only bill that you may receive is linked to the co-pay or deductible as required by your insurance plan.

       

      Please note that it is very likely that you will receive an explanation of benefits (EOB) listing neuromonitoring charges but this is not a bill.

       

      Surgimon is dedicated to advocacy for your rights and transparency of our billing. If you ever have a question, please talk to us.

      Patient Rights Surgical Neuromonitoring Associates

      Rights

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      The patient has the right to considerate and respectful care when neuromonitoring services are being provided.

       

      The patient has the right to every consideration of privacy. Any discussion about the neuromonitoring to be provided will be conducted discreetly.

       

      The patient is entitled to information about the neuromonitoring procedures. The patient has the right to know the name of the person responsible for neuromonitoring.

       

      4 patient rights Surgical Neuromonitoring Associates
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      The patient has the right to refuse neuromonitoring and to be informed of the medical consequences of doing so.

      The patient has the right to expect that all communications and records pertaining to the neuromonitoring should be treated as confidential, except otherwise as required by law.

      The patient has the right to review the neuromonitoring report and to have the information explained as necessary.

      7 patient rights Surgical Neuromonitoring Associates
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      The patient has the right to know about business relationships among Surgimon, educational institutions, other healthcare providers, or payers that may influence the patient’s treatment and care.

      The patient has the right to examine and receive explanation of any bill for neuromonitoring services, regardless of the source of payment (if applicable).

      The patient has the right to voice concerns regarding the neuromonitoring services provided, to have those concerns reviewed and, when possible, resolved.

      1. The patient has the right to considerate and respectful care when neuromonitoring services are being provided.
      2. The patient has the right to every consideration of privacy. Any discussion about the neuromonitoring to be provided will be conducted discreetly.
      3. The patient is entitled to information about the neuromonitoring procedures. The patient has the right to know the name of the person responsible for neuromonitoring.
      4. The patient has the right to refuse neuromonitoring and to be informed of the medical consequences of doing so.
      5. The patient has the right to expect that all communications and records pertaining to the neuromonitoring should be treated as confidential, except otherwise as required by law.
      6. The patient has the right to review the neuromonitoring report and to have the information explained as necessary.
      7. The patient has the right to know about business relationships among Surgimon, educational institutions, other healthcare providers, or payers that may influence the patient’s treatment and care.
      8. The patient has the right to examine and receive explanation of any bill for neuromonitoring services, regardless of the source of payment (if applicable).
      9. The patient has the right to voice concerns regarding the neuromonitoring services provided, to have those concerns reviewed and, when possible, resolved.